This survey course is an overview of European history from ancient times to the 18th century. We start with the Mediterranean Paleolithic and move chronologically through time to study the ancient Phoenicians, Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and Hebrews. Then we expand geographically to study Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and end with the European Enlightenment in the 17th and 18th centuries. The emphasis of the class is on the crucial intellectual, political, artistic, and social developments during this time period including: the establishment of agriculture; the appearance of cities; the invention and refinement of writing; the development of legal codes; the influence of wars and empires; the formation and growth of Judaism, Christianity and Islam; and the evolution of key ideas about science and technology.    

This course is a survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States from pre-European contact through post-Civil War reconstruction. We will touch upon the histories of the colonial era, establishment of the new nation, sectional problems, national growth, disunion and reconstruction. Throughout the class we will focus as often as possible on the lives of individuals who created the new nation and a new society. In particular, we will explore the interactions between Native Peoples, Africans, Europeans, and the developing creole Americans in colonial and national contexts.

This course is a survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States from pre-European contact through post-Civil War reconstruction. We will touch upon the histories of the colonial era, establishment of the new nation, sectional problems, national growth, disunion and reconstruction. Throughout the class we will focus as often as possible on the lives of individuals who created the new nation and a new society. In particular, we will explore the interactions between Native Peoples, Africans, Europeans, and the developing creole Americans in colonial and national contexts.    

This course is a survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the United States from the Civil War up to the present. We will touch upon the histories of post-Civil War Reconstruction, agrarian and industrial activism, the Progressive Era, two World Wars, Vietnam, 20th-century social movements, the Cold War, and the U.S. involvement in the Middle East. Throughout the class we will focus as often as possible on the lives of individuals who were active in making the history of the United States in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries.